Journal cover Journal topic
Earth System Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 2.771 IF 2.771
  • SNIP value: 1.216 SNIP 1.216
  • IPP value: 2.326 IPP 2.326
  • SJR value: 1.371 SJR 1.371
  • h5-index value: 9 h5-index 9
ESD cover
Chief editors:
Axel
 
Kleidon
,
Valerio
 
Lucarini
 & 
Ning
 
Zeng

Earth System Dynamics (ESD) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and public discussion of studies that take an interdisciplinary perspective of the functioning of the whole Earth system and global change. The overall behaviour of the Earth system is strongly shaped by the interactions among its various component systems, such as the atmosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere, oceans, pedosphere, lithosphere, and the inner Earth, but also by life and human activity. ESD solicits contributions that investigate these various interactions and the underlying mechanisms, ways how these can be conceptualized, modelled, and quantified, predictions of the overall system behaviour to global changes, and the impacts for its habitability, humanity, and future Earth system management by human decision making.

News

Website relaunch

10 Mar 2015

The ESD website has been given a new look, and the navigation has been adjusted.
Further details:

APCs in ESD waived for 2015

20 Dec 2014

To further the growth of ESD in 2015, the European Geosciences Union has decided to waive the article processing charges again.

ESD provides full-text XML

13 Nov 2014

Earth System Dynamics (ESD) has started an XML-first workflow and will provide all new articles in full-text XML from now on. 

Recent articles


Highlight articles

T. Herrington and K. Zickfeld

Recent studies have identified an approximately proportional relationship between global warming and cumulative carbon emissions. This relationship – referred to as the transient climate response to cumulative carbon emissions (TCRE) – is useful for climate policy applications. We show that the TCRE is constant for cumulative emissions lower than ~1500GtC but declines for higher cumulative emissions. We also find the TCRE to decrease with increasing emission rate.

K. Nishina, A. Ito, P. Falloon, A. D. Friend, D. J. Beerling, P. Ciais, D. B. Clark, R. Kahana, E. Kato, W. Lucht, M. Lomas, R. Pavlick, S. Schaphoff, L. Warszawaski, and T. Yokohata

Our MS focused on uncertainties terrestrial C cycling under newly developed scenarios with CMIP 5 experiment. This study is first results to figure out the relative uncertainties of projected terrestrial C cycling in multiple projection components. Only using our new model inter-comparison project datasets enables us to evaluate various uncertainty sources in projection  periods. The information about relative uncertainties are useful for climate science and the climate change impact evaluation.

Publications Copernicus